Buganda Agreement Effects

By establishing Uganda`s northern border as the Kafu River, the Colvile Agreement of 1894 formalized that Uganda would obtain certain areas in exchange for their support against Bunyoro. [1] Two of the “lost counties” (Buyaga and Bugangaizi) were returned to Bunyoro after the referendum on lost counties in Uganda in 1964. [7] The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] and signed among others by Mr. Katikiro Apollo Kagwa, on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), then a young child, and Sir Harry Johnston on behalf of the British colonial government. At the request of Sir Gerald Portal, Alfred Tucker, Bishop of East Africa and later Bishop of Uganda, asked the British authorities to take control of Uganda. [2] On 29 May 1893, a contract between Portal and Kabaka Mwanga secured Uganda as a British protectorate. On August 27, 1894, Mwanga was forced to sign another contract with Colonel H.E. Colvile, who favoured the conventional acquisition of the territory. [3] Although the treaties of 1893 and 1894 were concluded because Uganda, as defined by the Berlin Conference, stumbled upon the British sphere of influence, Britain did not have the sanctity of traditional leaders and their peoples. It was important that an agreement be reached, contrary to a treaty, so that British domination would become de jure and not de facto. [3] The agreement stipulated that Kabaka should exercise direct control over the indigenous people of Buganda, who administer justice by Lukiiko and its officials.

[6] He also consolidated the power of Bakungu`s majority-Protestant client leaders, led by Kagwa. The British sent few civil servants to run the country and relied mainly on the Bakungu chiefs. For decades, they have been privileged because of their political abilities, their Christianity, their friendly relations with the British, their ability to collect taxes and Entebbe`s proximity to Uganda`s capital. In the 1920s, British administrators were more confident and needed less military or administrative support. [4] The Uganda Herald newspaper of 14 August 1914 reproduced the oath: “I Daudi Chwa, I swear that I will serve our sovereign lord King George V well and truly in Kabaka`s office in Buganda and I will be right according to the law and the use of the protectorate of Uganda, without fear or favor, affection of goodwill.

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